Affordable, antique lighting fixtures in many styles, circa 1885-1945. Chandeliers, pendants, sconces. Victorian, Craftsman, Art Deco & more.

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  • Visit our brick and mortar store
  • We invite you to come see these wonderful lighting fixtures in person, at our store at 203 F Street, in historic Old Town Eureka.


    Located in beautiful Humboldt County, on the Redwood Coast of Northern California, Eureka boasts an abundance of music, local art and community theater, great shopping and dining, historic architecture, and access to some of the world's most breath-taking natural wonders -- rugged coastline and sandy beaches, tall trees and nature trails, wetlands and wildlife, mountains and rivers.  In nearby Arcata is Humboldt State University.  And throughout the area, from Fortuna to Trinidad, there are charming Bed and Breakfast and hotel accommodations.


    Old Town is situated between Highway 101, which becomes 4th and 5th Streets in Downtown Eureka, and the Waterfront, with its newly renovated Boardwalk, facing Woodley Island Marina on Humboldt Bay.  You'll find our store right in the heart of Old Town, on the corner of 2nd and F Streets, kitty-corner from the gazebo, fountain and pigeons of Old Town Square.  Next door, we have the best coffeehouse in town; three blocks away is one of the area's many great microbreweries; there are restaurants and unique shops on every block; and at the foot of 2nd Street, just seven blocks away, stands the finest example of Queen Anne architecture you are ever likely to see.


    In addition to the large selection of chandeliers, pendants and sconces you see pictured here on our website, at our store you'll also find floor lamps and table lamps, lovely fabric lampshades both fancy and simple, antique as well as new glass lighting shades, and window displays of vintage collectibles and gifts, such as German Beer Steins and Wooden Duck Decoys.  Prominently featured on our south wall is an art exhibition, by a different local artist each month; prints by local artists are also offered.  And on the airwaves, classical music.


    The restoration of our vintage lighting fixtures and lamps, and our Lamp Repair Service, is performed on site, so bring along your lamp or lighting fixture that needs attention.  Or be prepared to help us design your reproduction or custom lighting fixture on the spot.  And if it's a new lampshade for a table lamp that you need, bring along your lamp if possible, to ensure that we find you a shade of suitable size and style, and the right harp, that makes your lamp look just right.


    If you're driving north on Hwy 101, turn left on F Street and go three blocks; if you're driving south on Hwy 101, turn right on F Street and go two blocks.  We're right there at the stop sign, on the right, at the corner of 2nd and F.


    Parking is available on the street, in a handful of small city parking lots nearby, and in a large, unmetered lot on 1st Street at the foot of D, three blocks away.


    See you soon!


    Ken Norman
    20 October 2010

  • Things to do in Humboldt County
  • While visiting Humboldt County, you'll find a wealth of possibilities for things to see and do. The area features miles of unspoiled coastline, and awe inspiring, old growth redwoods -- the largest trees on earth. The wild and scenic rivers are a wonderful way to experience the outdoors from an amazing perspective. You'll find unique and lovely towns and communities along the north coast, all with interesting history, wonderful specialty shops and great choices for dining. There are lots of great resources for more information. Here are just a few:

    http://redwoods.info
    Official Travel Site of Humboldt County, Home of the World Famous California Redwoods.

    http://101things.com/humboldt
    Entertainment, Where to Stay, Shopping, Dining, Activities, Culture & History.
    You can also pick up their free 114 page publication at our store!

    http://eurekamainstreet.org
    Great calendar of events and links to more resources.

    http://eurekaoldtown.com

    Excellent guide to shopping, dining, etc., specific to our neighborhood... Old Town - Eureka!

    http://thepalette.com
    The arts are alive and well in Humboldt County!  Here's your guide to art and culture in HumCo.
    You can also pick up The Palette Magazine at our store.  It's free!

    http://northcoastjournal.com

    Free weekly and outstanding web journal of people, politics and art.  For news and opinion, see also http://lostcoastoutpost.com.
    If these people aren't reporting and commenting on it, it isn't happening!


    Fun things to do while in Old Town Eureka might include a stroll on the Boardwalk, and a cruise along the bay on the Madaket, which happens to be the smallest licensed bar in the state of California. The Madaket is also the nation's oldest passenger ferry. Check it out at
    http://www.humboldtbaymaritimemuseum.com/madaketcruises.html.

    Be surewhile in Old Town to check out The Carson Mansion, an amazing example of American Queen Anne style, built in 1884-1886. This is according to Wikipedia, where you'll find The Carson Mansion on the main page for Victorian Architecture.

    Here in Old Town you'll also find Marty with his horse Barney and carriage prepared to give a good old fashioned clip clop carriage ride through Old Town. It's a really fun way to have just a bit of a tour guide experience.  They park just across the street from our shop. Or call local historian Ray Hillman, for an in-depth historic tour of our fair city. 707-445-2117.

    Speaking of Old Town, this lovely little shopping district features several art galleries, antique stores, unique shops and terrific restaurants. Some of our favorite restaurants are all right here in Old Town. Let's begin with coffee and breakfast.

    Right next door to our shop you'll find Old Town Coffee and Chocolates http://oldtowncoffeeeureka.com, with wonderful freshly roasted coffee, sweets and free internet available. Yesterday we had a fabulous breakfast at Cafe Waterfront, on the corner of 1st and F Streets, a stone's throw from the boardwalk. One block down 2nd Street, the best bagels and fixings can be found at  Los Bagels, multicultural bagel bakery and cafe: http://losbagels.com. In addition to the best bagels, they have delectable pastries; my favorites are the corn lime cookies and the chango bars, not to mention the best Mexican hot chocolate. In this same neighborhood you'll also find Ramone's cafe http://ramonesbakery.com, which boasts great coffee and pastries.

    There are several great lunch spots here in Old Town that we really like, though we usually brown bag it -- but if we didn't, just a couple of doors down, Bon Boniere has great casual sandwiches, wraps, soups and delicious sweets, from ice cream to fudge. Just a couple blocks away you'll find the Lost Coast Brewery and Cafe http://www.lostcoast.com, a great place for burgers (made with local, grass fed beef) and should you happen to need a cold one to go with that, their beer made right there on site is very fine, with many different brews to choose from. Interested in something a bit trendier, possibly healthier, just across the street from our place you'll find Hurricane Kate's http://www.hurricanekates.com, an awesome place for creative salads, appetizers, and small plates. If what you want is delicious satisfying Mexican food, you can't go wrong with Chapala Authentic Mexican Restaurant http://www.chapalacafe.com, margaritas, enchiladas and tacos, oh my. And if you just need a couple of slices, try Smugs http://www.smugspizza.com, also right up the street for yummy pizza. My favorite Italian place for lunch is Mazzotti's http://www.mazzottis.com/eureka.html, tasty Italian sandwiches and more.

    For dinner in Old Town, and Eureka in general, we have several favorite spots. Again, beginning here in Old Town our favorite sushi place is definitely Bayfront Restaurant, located at One F Street. One, how's that for an address? Try their sushi specials, there are a number of them and they're ALL great. We've never felt motivated to order anything else off of their menu, though they have lots of other options, including an Italian menu. On F Street as well, though this one's a short drive, rather than walking distance, but oh, so worth it, is Brick and Fire Bistro
    http://www.brickandfirebistro.com. We went there for my birthday this year, and everything was delicious and perfect, great wine selection, best beet and goat cheese salad we've ever had, super gourmet pizzas, among other things. The creme brulee was really fabulous too. For terrific local seafood, our favorite place is The Sea Grill, with a large selection of seafood dinners, huge salad bar, and a full bar. Our favorite place for casual fare, fish and chips specifically, is Gallagher's Irish Pub. Their reuben sandwiches are our teenager's favorite. Practically next door to us on Two Street (as the old-timers call 2nd St.), there are mouth watering steaks at the Oberon Grill http://oberongrill.com. Of course, Ken's favorite thing at the Oberon is the historic chandelier! And there's very fine dining on the corner of 3rd and G Streets, at Avalon http://avaloneureka.com.

    There are of course many many more wonderful place to dine in the area, be sure to pick up a copy of The Journal's Menu of Menus when you arrive in the area (available on the sidewalk, right outside our door).

    If live theater is what you like, there are several different theater companies in the area with performances going on as often as not. Here in Eureka you'll find The North Coast Repertory Theater http://www.ncrt.net, Redwood Curtain http://www.redwoodcurtain.com and The Humboldt Light Opera Company http://www.hloc.org/index.php. In Arcata, Center Arts http://www.humboldt.edu/centerarts is the university affiliated group that hosts wonderful performances throughout the year. And Blue Lake's Dell Arte Theater http://www.dellarte.com should not be missed for hilarious, often musical, original physical theater with lots of local flair! Ferndale Repertory Theater http://www.ferndale-rep.org is yet one more venue for great theater, in the Victorian village of Ferndale, slightly to the south.

    Eureka is also home to an outstanding community orchestra, The Eureka Symphony http://www.eurekasymphony.com with performances in the beautiful Arkley Center http://www.arkleycenter.com, a block or two from Old Town.

    There are so many wonderful places in which to enjoy the outdoors here, in these lovely small coastal towns, in the redwoods, in the hills and beyond. In Arcata you'll discover the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, an awesome place for bird watching and strolling or bicycling. And Arcata is where you'll find the Redwood Community Forest, conveniently located next to Humboldt State University's campus. http://www.humboldt.edu Along the coast just a bit further north is gorgeous Trinidad, a small fishing town where several fabulous bed and breakfast accommodations may be found. While in Trinidad be sure to take a walk along Moonstone Beach, one of my favorites, and visit Moonstone Grill
    http://www.moonstonegrill.com  for fine dining with the most fabulous views, especially at sunset. Hiking Trinidad Head is something not to miss, an amazing oceanic hike right at the water's edge. Patrick's Point State Park is not much further north and has wonderful hiking trails. Wedding Rock is my favorite spot at Patrick's Point. Fern Canyon can be found still a bit further north and is a favorite day-hike, located in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. The ferns and canyons are some of the most incredible you're ever likely to see.

    Considering relocating to the North Coast? Check out this recent article from Sunset Magazine, http://www.sunset.com/travel/outdoor-adventure/best-places-to-live-00418000070574/page8.html  Apparently, Eureka is one of "The West's best places to live -- Entrepreneur? Artist? Raising a family? Behold: the West's best spots to suit your lifestyle."

    Of course, we hope that when you visit the north coast of California you'll find the opportunity to come in and check out our amazing collection of vintage lighting fixtures, local art, and other great stuff... here in the heart of Old Town Eureka, on the corner of 2nd and F.

     

  • This month's featured artist
  •  

    Our Featured Artist for the Month of November, 2014:

     

    Margaret Kellermann

           "The Ocean in All Weather," acrylic paintings on canvas.   

        

       

    "Trinidad Bay: Sunday Morning"

        

    Artist Statement

         

    As the title "The Ocean in All Weather" implies, her abstract seascapes move from calm blues and golds to stormy reds and purples. Says Kellermann: "I remember my dad, who was in the Coast Guard, coming in from the porch at sunset and saying, 'Red sky at night, sailor's delight.' So there's a painting I dedicated to him that shows nothing but a red-orange sky and ocean: 'Sailor's Delight.'"

    Instead of a brush, Kellermann applies paint with a palette knife, giving texture and motion to the scenes. Almost every painting describes the ocean horizon and the sea's colors changing to reflect the sky. "Every day the ocean is different," she says. "The ocean's horizon line is fascinating to me, because it's not really there. If you took a boat out, you couldn't find that line. It keeps moving away. But unless there's heavy weather, whenever you look out there, you see a calming stripe between sky and ocean."

    For most of her life, Kellermann has lived on the West Coast, moving like a pinball through cities and towns from Alaska to California, but almost always within sound of the waves. In Seattle and Astoria, Oregon, she showed her sea-glass-on-glass work, as well as large-scale collage. More recently, since moving to Humboldt County last year, her acrylic seascape paintings have been shown at Westhaven Center for the Arts, as well as at venues for art nights in Arcata and McKinleyville. Her work is currently on display at Strawberry Rock Gallery in Trinidad, as well as at Old Town Antique Lighting in Eureka. A singer-songwriter, she plays guitar and performs in cafes and other venues around the county, including the recent Eureka Historic Homes Tour.

       

      

       "Alchemy"

       

    Upcoming Arts! Alive - Eureka

    Join us for Arts! Alive, from 6 to 9 p.m. on the first Saturday of every month, a gala arts walk in Old Town and Downtown Eureka.  Every gallery, store and restaurant that showcases the work of local artists is open, the artists whose works are on exhibit are usually present to talk with you about what they do, refreshments are sometimes served, live music can often be heard, and hordes of happy people of all ages stroll from place to place, soaking in the scene and seeing a lot of great artwork.  Visitors to the area who love the arts and the best of small town life, would do well to plan their trip to coincide with this monthly, year-round, rain-or-shine event.

    Next Arts! Alive:  Saturday, November 1, 2014

    Old Town Antique Lighting, corner of 2nd & F: 

            Margaret Kellermann

           "The Ocean in All Weather," acrylic paintings on canvas.

              

  • How high is your ceiling?
  • Most of the chandeliers and pendants pictured here, can be lengthened or shortened or otherwise modified to be suitable for most ceilings.  Often, we can offer to shorten a piece at no extra charge, or lengthen it for a modest surcharge, or make a fixture that was designed for a level ceiling, suitable for installation from a sloped ceiling.

    Please inquire about the possibility of hanging a certain fixture in a particular location in your home, before ruling it out based on its length or design.

    How high is your ceiling?

    To determine the proper length of your lighting fixture, we need to know the height of the ceiling where it will be installed, and whether it will be an overhead light or hang over a table (or kitchen counter or bar).  We'll also need to know whether the ceiling is level, or sloped (a.k.a. pitched, cathedral).

    The easiest way to measure the height of your ceiling, requires a 1" wide, retractable tape measure.  Pull it out a few feet and, bending it over, put the end on the floor.  Repeatedly pulling out more tape, advance the bend in the tape upward until it touches the ceiling.  If you cannot read the tape at that height, grasp both legs of the bent-over tape and lower it down to eye level to get your reading. If you are math-challenged, think only in terms of inches, not feet -- it will be so much easier.

    If your fixture is to hang overhead, we feel it is necessary that it hang no lower than 80" (6'8"), the height of a standard door jamb, and we would generally recommend at least 84" (7') whenever possible.

    If your ceiling is at least ten feet high, it is helpful to consider a general rule of pleasing proportions, that a lighting fixture should hang one-third of the way to the floor.  To follow this guideline, from a twelve-foot ceiling, a fixture would hang 48" to a height of 96" (8'); from an eleven-foot ceiling, it would hang 44" to a height of 88" (7'4"); from a ten-foot ceiling, it would hang 40" to a height of 80" (6'8").  I think most with a ten-foot ceiling, however, would be happier with a fixture 36" long, that hung no lower than 7' high, especially if they are fairly tall.

    Over the dining table

    I feel that the old rule of thumb, that a chandelier should hang down to a height of 30" above the table, is too low for most homes today.  If the top of a dining table is 30" high, give or take an inch, this rule would place the bottom of a chandelier at only five foot high.  While this might be fine for a formal dining room in a traditional setting, where family and guests enter and immediately sit, and stay seated until they rise and leave the room, today, many have a dining table more integrated with the rest of the home, and often socialize in a more informal way, standing in the kitchen or around the table, and talking to one another across the table.  I am 6'2" tall, and in order for a chandelier not to be "in my face," interfering with making direct eye contact across the table with another tall person, it needs to be a little higher than that.  Some say that we are taller than our eighteenth century counterparts, due perhaps to better nutrition. Also, our modern incandescent and flourescent lamps both are much brighter than the candle, oil lamp, open-flame gas and early electric lighting of over a century ago, when a luminaire had to be hung as low as possible to give enough light down at table level.  Therefore, in most situations, I recommend that a lighting fixture be sized to hang down to 6' (72") high over the table or kitchen counter or bar, or at the most, to 5'8" (68"), if the visual mass is not the lowest portion of the fixture.  This means a fixture 24-28" long from an eight-foot ceiling, 36" long from a nine-foot ceiling, 48" long from a ten-foot ceiling, etc.

    Eight foot ceilings

    If you have eight foot ceilings, you may consider the lights in our "chandeliers" catagory for over your dining table, as many of them can be shortened to 24" or so.  Elsewhere, you can shop the "flushmount" category, for fixtures that mount flush to the ceiling or hang no lower than 16" (for a minimum clearance of 6'8" (80").

    For bedrooms, hallways and bathrooms especially, consider bead-chain fixtures, with beautiful shades from the 1930s-early '40s.  There are many lovely vintage shades available, which we sell mainly with new fixtures, either solid brass (polished and lacquered, or nickel plated and polished), or steel (which are cheaper, but susceptible to rust).  If this is the type of fixture for you, choose the shade you like (letter suffix), and the type of new fixture you want (solid brass or steel) and its finish (brass -- polished and lacquered, brass -- plated with nickel and polished, brass -- with applied finish of paint and/or tinted lacquer; or steel -- unfinished, or steel -- with applied finish).  Applied finishes include "antique brass," "oil rubbed bronze," "coppery chocolate," "satin black," "antique gold," etc.)  Note, these fixtures have just one light (60 watt max.), hang only about ten inches from the ceiling with shade, are not very expensive, and can be changed up easily by acquiring alternate shades (seasonally, when you tire of that color, etc.).

    Sloped ceilings

    If you have a sloped ceiling, and are in love with a gaslight, gas-electric combination, or early electric pendant or chandelier, some modification will have to be made to your fixture, to allow it to hang plumb from a ceiling that is not level.  Remember, gas lighting required plumbing; the iron pipe bringing gas to a chandelier came out of a level ceiling at a right angle to the ceiling.  (A "gas" light that hangs from a chain is the easiest bogus reproduction to spot!)  Such a fixture can be modified to have a loop at the top of its down rod which can interlock with a loop on a low-profile canopy, or can be joined to a loop on the canopy with a single link of chain.  Or, an adjustable, brass swivel can be interposed between the top of the downrod and the canopy.  However, either method will spoil somewhat the historic authenticity of such a fixture.

    Alternatively, a wooden, wedge shaped block can be attached to your ceiling at the point where the pendant or chandelier will be installed, to provide a level point for its mounting.  This can be textured if necessary and painted to blend in with your ceiling, and would mean your gas or early electric fixture would not have to be altered from its original design.  A half-inch deep, surface mounted "pancake" junction box could be screwed to the bottom surface of the wedge, for a respectable installation by today's standards.  Talk to your contractor or handyman about the feasibility of this approach in your situation.

    If a fixture you are interested in, hangs on a chain from a deep canopy with a blind stem, here we would also recommend switching to a relatively flat, or low-profile canopy, so that such a stem would not protrude from the canopy at a weird angle, before the chain hangs plumb from that point.

    Your junction box (or lack thereof)

    Unless you request otherwise, your lighting fixture will come with a crossbar or bracket for mounting to a modern junction box, which we assume will be recessed in the ceiling or wall, its bottom or front surface more or less flush with the surface of the ceiling or wall.  If you would rather we provide an old-fashioned, three- or four-footed iron or steel mounting foot which screws directly through the lath and plaster into a ceiling joist or wall stud, or if you intend to install to a pancake junction box, please let us know!  The contour of some canopies will not cover a pancake j-box, and the inner pipe of your pendant or chandelier may have to be shortened slightly to attach to either type of surface mounted hardware, as the outer tubing of the downrod may not be long enough to allow the canopy to slide down the additional half inch or more.

    We try to make all our products a cinch to install.  Just let us know what you've got, so we can make sure you get what you need!


  • Anatomy of a luminaire
  • Fun with lighting vocabulary!

    Sconce, conch, scone or sconch?

    • sconce - a wall mounted candle holder or lighting fixture
    • conch - the spiral shell of a tropical marine mollusk
    • scone - a small buscuit or cake, yummy with good coffee
    • sconch - um, no such thing, and it sounds funny

    Chandeliers, gaseliers, candelabra, oh my!

    • chandelier - a ceiling mounted, decorative lighting fixture with multiple arms for candles or oil, gas or electric lights
    • candelabrum - a large, branched candlestick holder with several arms.  Plural, candelabra...  not "candelabras."
    • gaselier, gasolier - a gaslight chandelier, really!
    • electrolier - an electric light chandelier.  Sounds so retro modern.

    Pendant or pendulum?

    • pendant - a single piece of jewelry that hangs on a necklace, OR a ceiling mounted lighting fixture for one light or lighting shade
    • pendulum - a weight hung from a fixed point so that it can swing back and forth, OR a pendant lighting fixture suspended on a chain, immediately after an earthquake, seriously.

    Other Frenchy and confusing words

    • luminaire - any lighting device, from nitelite to crystal chandelier
    • lamp - the thing that makes light, as in a "light bulb."  OK, I'm going to follow common usage, and reserve "lamp" for portable luminaires, i.e. table lamps and floor lamps, such as...
    • torchiere - a tall, ornamental candle stand or upward shining floor lamp
    • boudoir lamp - a cute little lamp for beside the bed, my dear
    • mogul - an important, powerful person, a steam locomotive with three pairs of drive wheels, a bump on a ski slope, a member of the Mongolian Tamerlane dynasty that used to rule India, OR great big light bulbs and their sockets, used in traditional floor lamps (a.k.a. mogul lamps, six-way lamps) and torchiere lamps, usually high wattage, 100-200-300 watt three-way, as opposed to ordinary, medium-base, Edison sockets and "regular light bulbs."

    Anatomy of a luminaire

  • Periods and Styles
  • Dr. Hauschka Skin Care
  • Having used Dr. Hauschka Skin Care myself for over a decade, and having sold the line in a different venue for as many years, I am now pleased to offer Dr. Hauschka Skin Care here at Old Town Antique Lighting, in Eureka.

    Dr. Hauschka employs a genuinely holistic approach to the balance and overall health of the skin, which is effective in nurturing all skin conditions.  The quality of the raw ingredients is unsurpassed, and adheres to the highest and most stringent European standards.  This holistic approach, and the organic, biodynamically cultivated and wildcrafted ingredients used, are part of what I appreciate about this very special skin care line.  I also just love the way my skin feels, using these clean, luxurious formulations.

    Dr. Hauschka Skin Care is a full line of skin care products, ideal for a complete skin care regimen. There are some, however, who find that just one or two of these special formulas will meet their needs.  Of the hundreds of women (and men) I've spoken with over the past several years who are thrilled with the results they find using these wonderful products, I think virtually all of them would say there are at least one or two "must have," "can't live without it," Dr. Hauschka Skin Care products.

    Did you know that you can also have an amazing Dr. Hauschka facial right here in Old Town, Eureka?  Barb MacTurk is a licensed Dr. Hauschka Skin Care esthetician, with a studio just three blocks from Old Town Square, on the fifth floor of the Commercial Building at the corner of 4th and E Streets.  I can personally attest that this is an absolutely luxurious and nurturing treatment.  You can reach her by phone at 707-443-5594.

    For more information about Dr. Hauschka Skin Care please feel free to contact me Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., at 707-845-3696, or find much more information and inspiration at their website, 
    www.drhauschka.com .

    Sara Norman

    Spring, 2011